Archive for the ‘Readings’ category

Homework: Record Effect reading

April 3, 2008

One of my absolute favorite pieces by one of the best music writers currently working (Alex Ross, music critic for the New Yorker) is a review of books looking at recorded music:

http://www.therestisnoise.com/2005/05/music_and_machi.html

Please read this article before class on Tuesday. For us, the issue is making sense of the impact recording makes upon music (and music education). This should give us more room to think about recording as a possible music literacy.

Below: here’s a poster for a class at the YMCA (where I stayed in NYC last week for the AERA conference):

Hip Hop class at NYC YMCA

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Homework: Read Alex Ruthmann’s piece for next Tuesday

February 5, 2008

Alex Ruthmann, Professor of Music Education at the University of Indiana (Terra Haute) will be presenting in class next week. We’ll be hearing about digital technologies in class, and there will be a presentation (with food!) at 5 p.m. in room 1172 where he’ll discuss his approach to the musical adaptation of the Writers Workshop model. Please read the pdf, which can be found in our “Classes” directory for next Tuesday.

You can also download the pdf yourself through JStor (although this can be tricky from off campus unless you have a web proxy installed):

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0027-4321%28200703%2993%3A4%3C38%3ATCWAAT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-5

Readings/Watchings for next Tuesday: Lessig and Sibelius

January 29, 2008

Lawrence Lessig’s Free Culture

One aspect of music education and culture today that does not receive enough attention is intellectual property. Broadly speaking, I believ that there are nearly insurmountable tensions between intellectual property/content holders, and educators.

To begin our work in this area, you have a big reading assignment for Tuesday. Luckily, what you will read is by one of the deepest thinkers and best writers in this space. Lawrence Lessig is a lawyer and law professor, and also a great writer on the intersection of law and technology. He is also one of the creators of the Creative Commons, which we’ll talk about more in the future.

For now, we begin with parts of one of his best books, Free Culture. This book is freely available as a download (or you can buy a hard copy):
http://www.free-culture.cc/freecontent/

Here’s your assignment (read for Tuesday):
“Piracy” (page 15 through 21)
Chapters 1, 4, and 5

 Sibelius Tutorial Videos

‘Reading’ isn’t exactly the right term, but to prepare for our more in-depth exploration of Sibelius, watch these six short videos before class on Tuesday. You can choose to watch them in the lab, where you’ll have access to the program, or at home (you don’t need to have the program to benefit).

The goal here is for you to become comfortable with, in general, what Sibelius can do. We’ll have three sources for understanding Sibelius (these videos, my presentations, and the complete reference which is built into the program).

Here’s a link to the videos.

We will jump right into notation, and these videos, while perhaps too charming with their accents, will give you a good concept for how Sibelius operates.

Required Reading: watch Sibelius videos before Tuesday, Sept 11

September 5, 2007

Well, ‘reading’ isn’t exactly the right term, but to prepare for our more in-depth exploration of Sibelius, watch these six short videos before class on Tuesday. You can choose to watch them in the lab, where you’ll have access to the program, or at home (you don’t need to have the program to benefit).

The goal here is for you to become comfortable with, in general, what Sibelius can do. We’ll have three sources for understanding Sibelius (these videos, my presentations, and the complete reference which is built into the program).

Here’s the link to the videos.

first reading assignment

August 20, 2007

Here is your first to reading assignment:

1. “Playing digital:Music instruction for the next generation

Please read the whole article and post a comment before Tuesday’s class. Here’s your prompt (please address both parts in your post):
1. What part of the article do most agree with? Is there something you strongly disagree with?
2. How was music technology used in your own school? What did they have? Was there a class, and did you take it? Was technology embedded in your ensemble experiences?

[Update: make sure you have created an account on WordPress in order to post! (And don’t use your UIUC password!) Also, any time a post comes from a new reader, I need to approve it. In other words, your first post will be delayed until I approve you as a recipient, but your subsequent posts will appear immediately]